How will Project Sunrise Impact Perth to London?



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Perth to London with Qantas has been nothing short of a success, however, with the eventual Sydney to London services as part of Project Sunrise, just how will the flight be impacted on a passenger load sense? In today’s video, I take a look at the stats.

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people eight five one hey everyone welcome back to another pre-recorded video so you know roll this part if you are interested in hearing about what's going on with my life in regards to my move to London feel free to check me out on Twitter at DJ's Aviation is that's frankly the best place for regular updates and more in March of 2018 fresh with the Boeing 787 Qantas launched their groundbreaking Perth to London service non-stop the decision to remove qf 9 & qf 10 to this route was a big one and saw the Melbourne Dubai London service removed the service from Perth to London and back has been an absolute success and while certainly not for everyone including me who does prefer the conventional stopover in Asia or Dubai it's seen its premium cabin 95 percent full year round it's frankly changed the game for Qantas in an international sense completely in 2022 or 2023 Qantas will launch projects sunrise the ambition to fly nonstop from eastern cities in Australia so Sydney Melbourne and Brisbane to the likes of London and New York these flights won't be easy and with their launch pose quite a few questions however for me the biggest one is just how Project sunrise will impact their new Perth to London service ultimately it's difficult to say for me how it will as well yet to get any firm announcement on the aircraft first route and how they gonna actually perform this is more of an analysis on what hypothetically could happen if you have any thoughts do let me know in the comments below we'll begin by taking a look at how passengers are split on the Perth to London service and back focusing on where the passengers journeys originate from according to statistics and reports the Perth to London service is broken up as follows 30% of the passengers on the flight start their journey in Melbourne this is after all where the flight does start 50 percent come from Perth where the notable part of the flight starts so that's the 17 hour Perth to London leg 10% from Sydney and finally a further 10% from other locations across Australia and even potentially New Zealand what's important to remember is that this doesn't occur all passengers flying to London this is just the qf9 statistics many fly to Singapore and connect on to qf1 while others fly to Asia to link up with British Airways Thai Airways Lufthansa Swiss and so many more this is even excluding the highly popular Dubai stopover point with Emirates or even Doha and/or Abu Dhabi with Qatar and Etihad respectively so now we've got the split in the location we can assume that 50% of the qf 910 service would not go as after all they'll fly straight out of Perth you could make the case though that a large chunk of that 10% that fly from Melbourne would may stay on the qf 9 service although depending on the prices and more they may be inclined to get the direct way from Sydney no doubt I would assume would see those in Sydney probably take the direct service and those from other cities could take any of their choice probably what's closer to them geographically that's all well and good however there's one major point to bring up and that's in regards to ultra long-haul travel this isn't for everyone and many are against flying 20 plus hours as always though I'm gonna take a look at this from both sides while some cannot stand ultra long-haul travel there's others that love it and believe its effectiveness in getting you from point A to point B without having to race across the terminals is brilliant so what will be the case for those that aren't a fan of this new 22-hour flight will they move to another airline will prices also dictate the performance of the flight after all there are much cheaper airlines to fly on to London and while it might not be the same service as Qantas some people need cheaper flights once again taking a look at this in an unbiased manner the qf9 service has been extremely successful and that's quite expensive without the sale option so who's to say the same won't happen with their Sydney to London service we've taken a look at stats and also load factors now there's one area that I've left out and that's those travelling to Sydney from London these are two major capitals and Sydney as many like to say is the unofficial capital of Australia with the Harbour Bridge Sydney Opera House cafes and more it's a popular location for those coming from London will the direct service in turn drive more to man through a Sydney being flown on qf 10 which is the London to Perth route around half of the passengers actually ended up continuing on via qf domestic services or other airlines to other Australian cities usually on the eastern side of Australia who's to say that if they had that direct option from London to Sydney on the eastern side they wouldn't just take that instead of going to Perth to me this is a fantastic topic to discuss and one of great interest to me so feel free to give me all your thoughts in the comment section below or head over to my Twitter as I mentioned and talk to me about it there I'm not sure how active I'm going to be in the comment section over the coming weeks so please do bear with me on that front thank you very much for tuning in to another one of my videos and I do very much look forward to you all joining me in the next one

23 thoughts on “How will Project Sunrise Impact Perth to London?”

  1. I think that If they did do a nonstop LHR to SYD or MEL then the LHR to PER to MEL wouldn’t be as profitable. There aren’t as many people who want to go to Perth as there are for like Melbourne or Sydney. They could simply connect from a direct flight to Perth from Sydney or Melbourne. I mean those short flights must be quite profitable. The only problem is Qantas needs to sort out comfort and make a revolutionary cabin for project sunrise. Like idk maybe have a cafe in economy so you can socialise and stretch your legs and stuff

  2. I strongly believe the config on these aircraft will bias towards business and first. You can't stick a human being in a Y seat for 21 hours nonstop. What I'd really be interested in seeing is the impact this would have on the ticket price for Y as well. Is qantas going to pass on their savings on landing fees, fuel, etc? I am going to assume that if they do it won't be the full amount, or at all.

  3. I would prefer the non-stop.  It would be quicker.  I believe a good topic would be the affect this will have on the Gulf carriers and maybe carriers like Singapore.  I would assume London to Australia is a pretty premium market, (Could be very wrong on that one.) and more passengers would go with a non-stop.

  4. most normal travelers on holidays will not torture their bodies with this kinda of hours in eco class….. i can see the benefit of business travel from LHR – MEL or LHR – SYD… if most are business travel then using Singapore's prem eco + business classes make more sense

  5. PER-LHR will remain daily with no issues. Currently most passengers are starting or finishing in Perth. Also not mentioned is the fact Perth has the highest amount of English expats in Australia calling home.

  6. London isn't really my destination, so changing at Dubai (or similar) is convenient. 

    Or do a direct flight NOW from Sydney to Athens and then split from there. If only Qantas had a well linked partner airline around that location. I guess that's what they wanted Emirates to do.

  7. There are only three reasons for someone to fly to/from London to Perth:

    1. They are traveling to/from Perth and you absolutely want non-stop service.
    2. The flight is the cheapest/most convenient between the two cities they are transiting.
    3. The flight is the cheapest.

    That’s it. There are no other reasons. If you start crossing out 2 and 3, then you’re down to just #1. Perth isn’t a small city, but it isn’t that big either. Qantas won’t keep a service with just a 60% load factor.

    By the way… Dubai is in Asia.

  8. I think the flights will be directed to different markets. I think that tourist passengers will prioritise price. Business passangers will prioritise time. If a business class flight from Sydney to London, non-stop takes 22h and any other flight with a stop over would take 30+h, most probably these people would pay the premium. If the non-stop option is, say, 50% more expensive for tourists, then they will probably take the longer and cheaper flight.

  9. As a Brit whose never been to Australia if I ever was I would fly via Dubai or Singapore to Sydney or Melbourne. As a kid I thought Sydney was the capital. Don’t know what there is in Perth and hence not a place I have any intention of visiting. If I do go the Australia it will be economy and then 20 plus flights do not interest me at all. I like the idea of stopping off either Dubai or Singapore. Been to Singapore and Dubai and both times stopped of in Dubai which was great. So got me this Perth route is a big no. Thanks

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